MLB Continues Building Social Media Buzz During World Series

Baseball bat hitting ball in slow motion: MLB's social media efforts: Twitter, Trends, CampaignsGame 1 of the World Series generated the second-most social media comments in postseason history, according to MLB.com. Mentions of Pablo Sandoval (“The Panda”) accounted for 20 percent of the 813,000 Facebook and Twitter comments, thanks to the athlete’s historic three-homer night. No count yet on how many mentions the infamous Barry Manilow reference from FOX announcer Tim McCarver received.

Social chatter during sporting events is expected to increase, as the number of sports fans who use social media to follow leagues, teams and players has almost doubled since 2011.

This postseason has been very successful for the MLB’s social media efforts, having generated twice as many social media comments by Oct. 10 as it did during the entire 2011 division series. This could be in part to the MLB’s expanded online presence and digital campaigns. Nearly every team now has its own Facebook, Twitter, GooglePlus, Pinterest, Instagram and Tumblr account, as well as check-in services.

In an effort to make its fans feel more engaged (and in turn get more buzz about baseball), the MLB has run online campaigns such as #MLBmembersonly, #FlyWitness and Pictober (#postseason). One of the most successful social programs is the MLB Fan Cave – a physical venue that hosts athletes and other celebrities whose interviews, antics and musical performances are shared online.

If the Giants’ and Tigers’ social networks and online buzz were analyzed to predict an outcome of the World Series, the winner would be the San Francisco Giants. According to Sysomos, the Detroit Tigers’ social mentions are at about only 2.3 million, compared to the Giants’ 2.75 million, which account for 54 percent of the conversation. The Bay Bombers also have a larger social following (as of Oct. 26, 2012, 9 a.m.):

Detroit Tigers
• Facebook: 1,118,742 likes
• Twitter: 183,242 followers

San Francisco Giants
• Facebook: 1,586,853 likes
• Twitter: 340,691 followers

No matter who comes away with the Commissioner’s Trophy, it’s apparent the MLB is winning with many of its fans when it comes to social media. The platforms are changing the way not only the MLB connects with fans, but players, too. Athletes talk directly with their fans, respond to their questions, encourage engagement and even retweet followers’ messages – which is as good as an autograph for many people nowadays.

If you want to find out if your favorite athlete is on Twitter, check out Tweeting-Athletes.com.

If You Can’t Beat ‘Em…Reasons for Facebook’s Instagram Purchase Become Clear

In the wake of Facebook’s $1 billion Instagram buyout and recent IPO, Zuckerberg & Co. have just thrown us into even more of a tizzy.

Head to the Apple App Store this afternoon and install the newest Facebook offering—Facebook Camera, a standalone photo-sharing app that allows you to take, edit and browse photos on a smartphone.

Wait, isn’t that Instagram? Yes, but wait.

First, the Instagram purchase isn’t final.

Second, Facebook claims that Instagram will remain its own entity.

Lastly, Instagram has only 40 million users compared to Facebook’s 900 million.

Maybe Facebook has once again flexed its muscles, breadth and buying power to eliminate competition.

Follow the links below for more information regarding Facebook’s new app and clarity on the Instagram purchase.

New York Times: http://nyti.ms/LtgIgx

L.A. Times: http://lat.ms/LJbAv8

All Things Digital: http://dthin.gs/Kufiph

Billion with a B – Why Facebook Bought Instagram

Facebook bought Instagram for $1 billion. Some cry genius, while others call it insanity. If you’re not one of the 30 million people using Instagram, you are probably wondering what makes it worth that amount of money. Some common assumptions are…

It costs a ton to download. Nope. Free. You can’t even buy stuff in the app. You just use it to unlock more features.

It’s a huge company. Nope. 13 employees before the Facebook purchase.

It taps into hard to reach markets.  Yes and no. Yes because lots of “hipsters” use it—a group known for being hard to reach. But no because it’s mostly used by iPhone and Android users —you have to have a smart phone to access it. And those groups are getting less exclusive by the second.

It has a long track record of success. Actually, it just launched in Q4 2010.

So with those myths debunked, now we find out why Facebook made the purchase.

Instagram was competition. Instagram users take and share photos, share their location and interact with other users. That’s Facebook’s thing. And they were getting beat. They couldn’t beat Instagram. So they bought it. And finally, the real big reason that no one really wants to talk about…

Facebook will use Instagram to make a ton of money. Bingo. That could mean ads on your mobile screens. Keep this in mind: Facebook (and now Instagram) isn’t valuable because of its products or services—it’s valuable because of its users. And they will use their users to make money. If you’re not paying for the product, there’s a good chance you are the product.

The Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball recently sold for $2 billion. That’s 130 years of baseball tradition for just twice the amount of an entity less than two years old. This is the world we live in…But then again, the Dodgers don’t have 30 million brand ambassadors.

Guess who does?